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Exhibition

Byzantine art through the eyes
of italian scholars

100 Years of Research. Exploring Byzantine Art History in Italy Through Personalities, Journeys,
Documents, and Images

More Details

Padua, Palazzo Liviano, Main Hall, Mezzanine
Piazza Capitaniato, 7, 35139 Padova PD

DATE

August 25th 2022

Exhibition

This exhibition devoted to Byzantine art history in Italy will be held in Palazzo Liviano, formerly the Humanities Faculty – a building erected, decorated, and frescoed in the 1930s by Ettore Fagiuoli, Giò Ponti, and Massimo Campigli, who were among the leading architects and painters of their day.
Through a range of partly unpublished documents, visitors will have the opportunity to explore the paths taken by the leading scholars in this discipline: Adriano Alpago Novello (1932-2005), Sergio Bettini (1905-1986), Giuseppe Bovini (1915-1975), Géza de Francovich (1902-96), Fernanda de’ Maffei (1917-2011), Giuseppe Gerola (1877-1938), and Paolo Verzone (1902-1986).
One section of the exhibition will commemorate art historians who have recently passed away: Claudia Barsanti, Raffaella Farioli Campanati, Ennio Concina, Italo Furlan, and Giancarlo Macchiarella.

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Memoirs, period photographs, and publications will illustrate the physical and intellectual journeys made by historians of Byzantine art. This subject became a focus of university courses in Padua and Rome in a historical period that witnessed a rediscovery of the Italian imperial tradition.
A video-interview recorded during the exhibition held at Istanbul’s Koç University (2018) will commemorate personalities otherwise not included in the exhibition purely for logistic reasons.
The proceedings of recent conferences and specific publications will help identify available photographic archives in Italy, enabling scholars taking part in the Congress to broaden their knowledge of the study of Byzantine antiquities in the 20 th century.

Exhibition

This exhibition devoted to Byzantine art history in Italy will be held in Palazzo Liviano, formerly the Humanities Faculty – a building erected, decorated, and frescoed in the 1930s by
Ettore Fagiuoli, Giò Ponti, and Massimo Campigli, who were among the leading architects and painters of their day.
Through a range of partly unpublished documents, visitors will have the opportunity to explore the paths taken by the leading scholars in this discipline: Adriano Alpago Novello (1932-2005), Sergio Bettini (1905-1986), Giuseppe Bovini (1915-1975), Géza de Francovich (1902-96), Fernanda de’ Maffei (1917-2011), Giuseppe Gerola (1877-1938), and Paolo Verzone (1902-1986).
One section of the exhibition will commemorate art historians who have recently passed away: Claudia Barsanti, Raffaella Farioli Campanati, Ennio Concina, Italo Furlan, and Giancarlo Macchiarella.
Memoirs, period photographs, and publications will illustrate the physical and intellectual journeys made by historians of Byzantine art. This subject became a focus of university courses in Padua and Rome in a historical period that witnessed a rediscovery of the Italian imperial tradition.
A video-interview recorded during the exhibition held at Istanbul’s Koç University (2018) will commemorate personalities otherwise not included in the exhibition purely for logistic reasons.
The proceedings of recent conferences and specific publications will help identify available photographic archives in Italy, enabling scholars taking part in the Congress to broaden their knowledge of the study of Byzantine antiquities in the 20 th century.

Curator
Valentina Cantone, Department of Cultural Heritage, University of Padua

Scientific committee

Michela Agazzi (Department of Philosophy and Cultural Heritage, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice), Livia Bevilacqua (Faculty of Education, Università Cattolica, Milan), Valentina Cantone (Department of Cultural Heritage, University of Padua), Manuela da Cortà (Independent scholar), Giovanni Gasbarri (Department of History Anthropology Religions Art History, Media and Performing Arts, Sapienza University of Rome). With the assistance of the architect Marta Pellegrini).

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